The Debt Snowball

The debt snowball method is a simple way to pay off your debts. Instead of tackling them all at once, you focus on paying off the smallest debt first. Then, when that’s paid off, you move to the next-smallest debt and so on until all your debts are gone. It’s an easy way to revitalize your finances because it gives you a sense of accomplishment right away—you’ll see progress right away rather than staring at a $10,000 balance on your credit card statement feeling hopeless and overwhelmed.

Debt Snowball

The Debt Snowball method is a proven way to eliminate debt. The principle behind this approach is simple: the faster you pay off your debts, the less you will owe overall. By focusing on paying off your smallest debt first and then moving onto the next one, you can quickly start seeing results.

The Debt Snowball method also works because it allows you to build momentum as you progress through your goals. Once you’ve paid off your first (or second) loan, it becomes easier to imagine that other loans will be eliminated in due time as well—and this makes it easier for us humans to maintain our motivation and keep going!

The method works because it saves you from wasting time on the highest interest rate loan, allowing you to pay more towards it every month and get out from under its burden sooner. The logic behind this method is pretty simple: if your goal is to pay off all of your debts in order of smallest balances first, then sit back and enjoy life as a debt-free individual!

Eliminate debt

The first step to getting out of debt is to list all your debts in order of size. If you have a credit card balance, a student loan balance and a car loan, start by making minimum payments on all three accounts except for the smallest one. Once this account is paid off (or almost paid off), put all the money that was going toward that account toward your next smallest debt, until you’ve eliminated all but your final one.

At this point, it’s time to focus on one remaining debt at a time while making bigger payments than just the minimums. Your goal should be to pay each debt down as quickly as possible—and then start over again!

Pay off Debt

Once you have your debt snowball ready, it’s time to start paying off your debt.

There are a few different ways to pay off debt (like the debt avalanche and debt snowball), but we recommend using the debt snowball method. It’s also called the “snowball effect” because it starts with small debts that are easier to pay off and builds momentum by adding larger debts into the mix. With this approach, you’ll eliminate all of your debts sooner than if you just paid off one at a time in any order or didn’t use any strategies at all!

Here are some tips on how to pay off your debts faster:

Debt Plan

  • Set up a debt payment plan.
  • Set up a budget, including all of your expenses and income.
  • Make a plan to increase your income, if possible – for example, by getting a second job or starting a side hustle (or both).
  • Make a plan to decrease your expenses, if possible – for example, by canceling subscriptions that aren’t providing enough value in exchange for the cost or shopping around for lower-priced options (like cable television).
  • Make a plan to increase savings by setting aside some money every month in an emergency fund or retirement account so you don’t have to take out additional debt later on when there might not be any other options available (for example: when you have no more credit left).

The debt snowball method will help you eliminate your debt faster.

The debt snowball method is a debt elimination method. It’s a debt reduction plan and a debt management strategy, too.

If you use the snowball approach to eliminating the debts on your list, you’ll get to see progress much faster than if you were trying to pay off all of them at once. You’ll be able to check something off your list with each payment made towards one of your debts, which will help keep motivation high and lead to more success in paying off all of your outstanding bills.

Conclusion

If you’re planning to pay off debt, the Debt Snowball method could very well be your best option. The debt snowball method is a tried and true way to get out of debt quickly. We’ve learned throughout this article that there are many different ways in which people approach their finances, but one thing that’s always going to remain constant is that everyone has money problems at some point in time or another. Using Dave Ramsey’s Debt Snowball Method will help you eliminate your debts faster than ever before because this strategy focuses on paying off what seems like smaller amounts at first but eventually becomes larger payments towards your debt balance as time goes on

Steps to get out of debt in Canada

Getting out of debt can feel like an impossible task. But it’s not. With the right information, guidance, and support, you can get out of debt faster than you think. The trick is knowing where to start. You might be surprised to learn that debt isn’t always bad—in fact, it can be helpful when used correctly. You just need to make sure that your debts are manageable and affordable so they don’t keep piling up on top of each other like a house of cards ready to collapse at any moment (which happens more often than you’d think). In this guide we’ll walk through what getting into debt looks like and how you can use these tips to get back on track with your finances!

When you’re in debt, it can feel like you’re never going to get out.

When you’re in debt, it can feel like you’re never going to get out. You might have the same thought I did: “I’ll never be able to pay off all this debt. I will always have debt.” The stress of living like this is intense, and as a result, so is the sense of being trapped—a feeling that’s only exacerbated by financial challenges such as low or unstable income and unemployment.

If your debt is causing stress and negatively affecting your life in other ways (for example, by limiting what you can do), then something has to change. Here are some ways to help:

  • Get back on track with budgeting
  • Start saving for the future

Your debt-to-income ratio will tell you how much of your income goes toward paying off your debts.

Your debt-to-income ratio is a way to measure your financial health. It’s the percentage of your income that goes toward paying off all of your debts. The debt-to-income ratio is calculated by dividing a list of outstanding debts by total household income. For example, if you have $20,000 in credit card debt—and annual household income is $50,000—your debt-to-income ratio would be 40 percent (20 / 50).

The higher the number on this scale, the more at risk you are for experiencing financial trouble down the road. If your ratio is too high (e.g., above 40 percent), it may mean that you can’t afford to take on any new loans or repay existing ones without getting deeper into trouble with debt collectors and creditors who want their money back immediately!

Understand the way that debt works and how it fits into your life.

The first step toward getting yourself out of debt is to understand how debt works in your life. Debt isn’t a bad thing, and it doesn’t always have to be bad for you. It can actually be a great tool for optimizing your finances and helping you achieve the things that are important to you. For example, if buying a house is something you want in the next few years, taking on some mortgage debt could be an excellent way to get there faster—assuming that the value of what’s being purchased outweighs the cost of borrowing money at interest rates higher than those available through other investments.

However, there are times when taking on too much debt isn’t wise at all; this usually happens when people don’t understand or respect their own limitations with regard to paying off loans over time (e.g., credit card balances). If this sounds like something that describes your own situation right now then please keep reading!

Know what happens if you don’t pay your bills on time.

You may think that if you skip a payment or two, it won’t matter. But if you don’t pay your bills on time, there are consequences. You could lose your credit score and find it hard to get loans in the future. Your creditor can also sue you for payment and send the case to collections if they decide not to pursue legal action themselves. These actions can make it difficult for you to get approved for new credit cards or loans in the future because they’ll lower your credit score even further.

There are many options for paying off debt and saving money, but not all of them work for everyone.

There are many options for paying off debt and saving money, but not all of them work for everyone. You can pay off debt in a variety of ways, including:

  • paying off your credit card with another credit card
  • using a cash back rewards credit card to save money on everyday purchases like groceries
  • taking out a personal loan or line of credit to pay down your debt faster (but this can be risky if you’re carrying too much debt)

If you need help deciding how you want to pay your debts, consider getting advice from an expert at CCDR.

If you’re struggling with debt, try these tips.

If you’re in trouble with your debt load, try these tips:

  • Pay off the debt with the lowest balance first and roll that payment toward the next largest the following month.
  • Make a budget and stick to it. If you don’t know where your money is going, you might be surprised by how much of it is going toward unnecessary spending—like those daily coffee runs or weekly happy hour outings that seem harmless but really add up over time.

With enough knowledge and support, getting out of debt can be less scary than it seems at first.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed by the idea of getting out of debt, don’t worry. With enough knowledge and support, getting out of debt can be less scary than it seems at first.

  • You can do it yourself: If you have a basic understanding of how to manage money and create a budget, then self-management might be an option for your situation.
  • You can get help from a professional at CCDR: A professional can help set up an action plan and provide guidance along the way as well as assist with difficult decisions or unexpected challenges along the way. While this type of assistance is often more expensive than self-help options, having someone else involved who understands what needs to happen may feel more reassuring during times when things seem overwhelming (and they will!).

Getting out of debt is a tough process, but it’s also a rewarding one. If you’ve managed to get this far and read this article about the best ways to save money and pay off debt, then you’re already taking steps toward your financial goals. The next step is simple: follow our advice! Keep in mind that there are many different approaches to spending less and saving more—whether it’s cutting down on eating out or finding creative ways around paying bills late. No matter what method works best for you personally, keep working towards those goals until they become habits instead of just resolutions by using our tips above as guidance along the way!

It’s possible for your vehicle to be repossessed if you don’t make timely payments on it.

Collateral is a valuable asset that is held by the lender when you take out a loan.

It’s important to know how collateral works, because it can protect you from repossession if you default on your payments.

In this article, we’ll explain what collateral is and how it works in Canada. We’ll also discuss which types of assets are considered acceptable by lenders as collateral for loans, and cover some unique situations where repossession may occur despite having reasonable security in place.

When you purchase a vehicle, the vehicle itself acts as collateral.

When you purchase a vehicle, the vehicle itself acts as collateral. You are borrowing money from a lender and then giving them something of value to secure that loan. The lender takes possession of your car as collateral until you pay off your debt; it’s like how when you get a mortgage, they take your house until you pay off your debt.

You must be aware of who has taken ownership of this property in order to ensure that no one else can take advantage of its presence within their possession.

If you stop making payments on your loan, the bank or other lender to whom you owe the money can come and take possession of your car.

However, they must follow the rules of whatever province in which the vehicle is registered. In most provinces, lenders must give you written notice before proceeding with repossession. This notice period varies from two to ten days depending on where you live and what kind of loan product it is (for example: secured vs unsecured).

The lender cannot repossess a vehicle if it’s being used for work purposes or transporting a member of your family who has special needs; however, they may still be able to put a lien against any other property owned by that person until their debt is paid off.

Ontario has a procedure in which the lender will send a letter warning that they intend to repossess your vehicle.

If you live in Ontario, the lender must send a notice of intent to repossess your vehicle at least 15 days before the repossession. The notice must be sent by registered mail to the address of the vehicle’s owner.

If you receive such a letter and believe that your loan is still current and your payments are up to date, contact your lender immediately and ask them to cancel their plans for repossession.

You can avoid having your car repossessed by ensuring that you make all of your payments on time.

Before you can begin to deal with this possibility, it’s important to understand why your car might be repossessed. If you fail to make payments on time, the lender will often threaten repossession as a way of getting its money back. However, if you’re in default on your loan and haven’t made any payments at all in years (or even months), it’s unlikely that a lender would bother pursuing repossession; your vehicle is simply not worth enough for them to go through the trouble of reclaiming it from its current location.

On the other hand, if you have made some payments but still have an outstanding balance on the loan—or are simply behind on one or more monthly installments—then there may be grounds for your car being taken back by its creditor! Of course, this would only happen if they were able to find out where exactly their asset was located (which could be difficult considering how many people don’t file address change notifications after moving). The takeaway here? Make sure that all of your debts are paid off on time so that no one comes knocking at night with torches or baseball bats demanding their money back immediately!

It’s possible for your car to be repossessed if you don’t make timely payments on it.

If you don’t make timely payments on your vehicle, the bank can repossess it. The bank buys your car from the original lender and then resells it to recoup some of their losses.

This is why it’s important to make sure that you always pay your vehicle loan on time. If you don’t, the car could be taken away from you and sold by someone else who doesn’t care about how much money and effort went into buying it originally.

You can avoid having your car repossessed by making all of your payments on time so that no one will want to take it away from you!

Conclusion

If you’re worried about your vehicle being repossessed, it’s best to make sure that you keep up with all payments. Also, keep in mind that there are laws in Ontario that require lenders to give you a warning before they can repossess your car.

How Badly do you want out of debt

Let’s face it, debt is a huge problem. If you’re in debt, you know that feeling of dread when the bills come in and the balance isn’t what you wanted it to be. The worst part about being in debt is not having any money left over for fun things after paying off your bills each month. What do people do? They go into even more debt because they want to buy something nice or take a vacation but don’t have enough money saved up (or cannot get financing). This leads us to wonder: how badly do you want out of debt?

I don’t want to be rich. I just want my debts paid off… and then some.

You’re not trying to be rich, you just want your debts paid off.

You want the freedom to do what you want, when you want.

Like retire at 60 and travel with your spouse? Do it!

Or maybe start a business that requires lots of work and long hours? Go for it!

Do you know what your debt payments are every month? If you carry over a balance on your credit card, have you looked at the minimum payment lately? Even if you have a payment of $50 on a credit card, that could take decades to pay off if you only pay the minimum.

To calculate how long it will take for your debt to be paid off, use this formula:

Total Debt / (Monthly Interest Rate x 12) = Time to Pay Off Debt in Years

Say you owe $25,000 in student loans with an interest rate of 6%, and you make monthly payments of $250. You would divide 25000 by (6% x 12) and get 210 months or 20 years.

How many credit cards do you have? Why do you have them? Do you really need so many accounts?

Credit cards are not free money. They’re not even a good way to build credit. You should never obtain a new credit card just because you want the rewards, and it’s best to stay away from co-branded cards that offer points for your favorite store or airline.

If you do have a lot of credit cards, consider how many accounts you really need. Do all these accounts come with annual fees? If so, can you cancel them? Are there any promotional deals available for signing up for a new card which would help offset the cost of switching over?

What is something that costs more than it’s worth to you? Is it a meal at a restaurant that doesn’t feed your family enough or make them feel satisfied? Is it a pair of shoes that don’t fit quite right or aren’t quite what you wanted? Is it an item from a store that doesn’t accept returns (or doesn’t offer refunds or exchanges)? You’re probably being wasteful somewhere in your life.

  • Don’t spend money on things that don’t give you value.
  • Don’t spend money on things that don’t fit your needs or budget.
  • Don’t spend money on things that don’t fit your lifestyle.

Are there things you want to do but aren’t doing because of money? Go on vacation. Start an education. Buy a car. Pay off debt so you can eventually retire and travel. For most people, these are things they’d like to do eventually. But for those holding out for someday, this list never seems to get fulfilled.

  • Go on vacation.
  • Start an education.
  • Buy a car.
  • Pay off debt so you can eventually retire and travel.

For most people, these are things they’d like to do eventually. But for those holding out for someday, this list never seems to get fulfilled—and it’s not just because of money but also because of time and other commitments (work, family). Unfortunately, the longer you wait until you start saving and paying down your debt, the more difficult it becomes when it comes time to invest in yourself or plan for something worthwhile later in life (like retirement).

Conclusion

If you want to cut out the waste in your life, it’s important that you start with what matters most. You can’t be wasteful with all of your money if you’re trying to pay off debt and save for retirement. So instead of feeling guilty about spending $5 on coffee each day, focus on where those dollars are going towards something important like retirement or paying down student loans.

Broken divorced person

If you’re getting a divorce in Canada, you have to divide your assets. This is more difficult than it sounds because there are many factors to consider. This guide will help you learn how to separate property and debts in a way that’s fair for both parties involved.

Who owns what.

The division of assets in a divorce will depend on the type of asset. Some types of assets are considered “family assets” and must be divided equally between you and your spouse, while others (such as gifts) are excluded from the division process.

Family assets include:

  • Money and investments
  • Property (houses, land)
  • Cars, boats and other vehicles

Do you need a lawyer?

If you are married and contemplating divorce, chances are you will need a lawyer to help with the divorce process. While there are self-represented litigants that can handle their own divorce, it is advisable to retain a lawyer as they will be able to navigate the difficult waters of family law. If you cannot afford a lawyer, speak with Legal Aid.

If you are not married but living together in a common-law relationship and considering separating from your partner, then it is advisable that both parties get legal advice from an experienced family law practitioner before making any decisions about how assets should be divided between them. The courts recognize that property rights exist for unmarried couples whose cohabitation has lasted for two years or longer (or if one party has provided caregiving services to children of their partner during this period). However, it may not always be easy for these couples to reach an agreement on dividing up things like pensions and RRSPs without outside help from lawyers who specialize in this area – so again: talk with someone who knows what they’re doing!

Who is responsible for the debts?

If you are the person who has to pay off the debt, you will be held responsible for it. In most cases, this means that you will be paying the debt until it is paid off in full (or until it is sold and paid off).

However, if at some point during the divorce process a court rules that your spouse should have been paying for the debts in question but was not doing so, then it may be possible for your spouse to claim any outstanding payments on those debts as income tax deductions.

How to divide assets.

The division of assets and debts is one of the most important parts of a divorce. It can be difficult to know what to do, especially if you have trouble making decisions on your own. The first step is to separate your assets from your spouse’s. Your lawyer can help with this task, but it will be up to you to decide which items stay with one partner and which belong exclusively with the other.

The next step is determining what should be considered part of both partners’ property during a divorce settlement process. Once again, these are matters best left in the hands of professional legal counsel; however, there are some general guidelines that may apply:

  • All assets owned before marriage or acquired during marriage by gift or inheritance (including trust funds) should not be split between partners; they remain entirely under ownership by whoever owns them before or after separation occurs
  • All debts incurred prior to separation remain under obligation unless otherwise agreed upon in advance by both parties involved
  • Any remaining shared debt must then be divided equally between each party based on their respective incomes from past tax returns

Divorce is a difficult time, and having a divorce lawyer can make it easier.

Divorce is a difficult time, and having a divorce lawyers can make it easier. Divorce lawyers can help you get a fair settlement, division of assets, division of debts, and division of support payments. A good divorce lawyer will help ensure that all parties are treated fairly throughout the process.

Divorce is never easy for anyone involved. It’s important to stay informed about your rights as well as the laws surrounding divorce in Canada so that you can make informed decisions about how your finances should be handled during this difficult time in your life.

Conclusion

Divorce can be a difficult experience, but it doesn’t have to be. With the right lawyer on your side and a good understanding of the process, you could end up much better off than your ex-spouse. This is why we suggest that every person who is going through a divorce should get legal advice.

Staying out of debt in Canada can be difficult. The credit card companies and other lenders have made it all too easy to get into the red. You may think that it is impossible to get ahead while avoiding debt traps, but there are ways to do so.

Get a copy of your credit report and make sure it is accurate.

  • Get a copy of your credit report. Click Here
  • Check for errors and make sure the information is correct. If it’s not, contact the credit reporting agency to get it fixed.

Keep track of your spending.

  • Keep track of your spending.
  • Know what you’re spending and where you are spending it.
  • Use a spreadsheet or budgeting software to keep track of all your expenses, especially those that are recurring (such as rent).
  • Place receipts in a folder for easy reference later on if the need arises, such as an audit or tax season.

Set up a budget and stick to it

The first step to staying out of debt is to set up a budget. A budget is a plan for your money, which will help you keep track of where it’s going and get an idea of how much money you have left over at the end of the month. You can use online tools like Mint.com or Quicken.com to create your own personal budgets, or download them from the Internet for free in Excel format.

Once you’ve created a budget and added all your expenses into it, stick to it! Instead of buying things on impulse, put aside some cash each week so that when payday comes around again (after all bills are paid), there’ll be enough left over for some fun stuff without having to borrow or charge more than planned for until next pay cheque rolls around again.”

Pay down your debts. It will build your credit rating and relieve stress.

The most important thing to do when you’re in debt is to get out of it as quickly as possible. You can do this by paying off the smallest debt first and then working on the next one. If you have multiple debts, try to pay more than the minimum payment each month so that your debts are paid off faster and you have less interest charged on them.

If your credit score is an issue for getting a mortgage or home equity line of credit, it might be worth paying off some of your smaller debts before making any large purchases like a car or house. This will not only improve your credit rating but also save money in interest charges over time. However, don’t use credit cards to pay off other credit cards because this will just lead to more debt!

Consolidate all your debt into one loan with a lower interest rate, if possible.

Consolidate all your debt into one loan with a lower interest rate, if possible.

This is the best way to get out of debt quickly and easily. Consolidating your debts means taking all of your different debts, like credit card bills and car loans, and combining them into one new loan. You’ll have one monthly payment instead of several smaller ones that are spread out over time, making it easier to budget each month. If you can consolidate all the debts into a lower-interest rate loan (usually from three percent to six percent), then this is what you should do first before doing anything else.

To find out whether or not consolidating will save you money on interest payments, go online and run some numbers for yourself using an online calculator like this one: Loan Calculator

If you have bad credit, consider a secured credit card to help rebuild your credit rating.

A secured credit card can help you rebuild your credit rating if you have bad or no credit history. You will apply for a secured card and make a deposit, which becomes your credit limit. The amount you deposit determines your interest rate and whether or not you will be approved for the card. If approved, payments are deposited directly into an account that is held by the bank until it’s paid off in full, so there are no surprises with interest or fees at renewal time.

Pros: A secure card can help establish a track record of paying bills on time and show lenders that they should consider offering regular unsecured loans in future when they see how capable YOU are at managing money responsibly.

Cons: Secured cards have higher than average interest rates compared to unsecured ones due to their riskier nature; however this may be justified if using them allows consumers access to more affordable loans down the road (especially those with low incomes). Get a Secured Credit Card

Applying for new credit cards may lower your rating, so stick with what you have.

Applying for new credit cards can lower your credit rating, so it’s best not to apply for one if you already have a lot of debt. If you do decide to apply, make sure that you are able to pay off whatever balance is on the card before the interest kicks in.

You should also keep in mind that while they can be useful tools, they can also be dangerous if misused. If you have no reason at all (like paying off medical bills or tuition), then it would probably be best not to get one right now. The same thing goes with borrowing money through a payday loan company : if there’s no need for such an expense then don’t take out a loan!

Get help from an accredited debt help agency like Canadian Customer Debt Relief. Their counsellors are trained to help you find the best solution for you, no matter where you live in Canada.

CCDR can help:

  • Understand your current financial situation
  • Figure out how much money is coming in and going out each month
  • Understand which debts are causing problems for you (credit cards? student loans? car payments?)
  • Create a plan that lets you pay off all or some of your debts over time

Conclusion

Debt can be a burden that holds you back from the life you want. It can also lead to stress and anxiety. The good news is that there are steps you can take to get out of debt and start saving money for the things you really want.

Introduction

When you get a credit card, you will be given the option of paying the minimum payment or a higher amount. You may not realize that if you pay just 2 percent of the balance owed each month, it could cost you hundreds or thousands of dollars more in interest than if you paid more than just the minimum amount. In this article, we’ll explain why paying more than just your minimum payment is better for your wallet and how to do it effectively so that you can save money!

Your minimum payment does not always have to be 2% of your balance.

The minimum payment is the amount you must pay on your credit card if you want to be considered in good standing with the company. It is not always the best way to pay off your debt, and it does not reduce your principle balance.

If you want to pay off your debt faster and save money in interest charges, consider paying more than this amount. For example, if you have a $2000 balance on a credit card with an 18% interest rate and you make only the minimum payment each month ($100), it would take over 2 years to get out of debt! If instead you paid $1000 per month (equivalent to 24% of the balance), then it would only take about 2 months.

You pay more interest if you just pay the minimum each month.

You pay more interest if you just pay the minimum each month.

When it comes to paying off your credit card balance, it’s tempting to just pay the minimum amount due each month, but that’s not a good idea. Why? Because minimum payments are calculated based on your interest rate—the higher your rate is, the higher your minimum payment will be. And since most credit cards have variable rates (meaning they’re tied to an index or a prime rate), those rates tend to go up when inflation rises and fall when deflation takes hold of an economy. Plus, if you don’t make any regular payments against this debt over time—which is like running up new charges on top of old ones—you’ll end up paying even more in interest than originally planned because the longer this debt remains outstanding, the more money it costs you in total cost of ownership expenses like finance charges and other fees charged by financial institutions like banks and credit unions (like transaction fees).

Minimum payments do not reduce your principle balance.

We know that it can be tempting to just pay the minimum payment on your credit card each month, but doing so will not reduce your principle balance. The minimum payment is the minimum amount you have to pay each month as a percentage of your balance. This means it will never go down because most companies calculate their minimum payments as a percentage of interest owed, not principal balance.

Minimum payments extend the term of your debt.

The problem with minimum payments is that they only cover the interest, not the principal. This means you’re only paying interest on your credit card balance and not actually reducing it. In other words, you won’t be freeing yourself from debt any time soon. You’ll just be paying more in total than if you had paid more when monthly payments were due (which is why we recommend always paying at least double your minimum).

Balance transfers are not a good option for long term debt management.

When you consider a balance transfer, think about the following:

  • Balance transfers don’t reduce your principle balance. They do, however, lower your interest rate and monthly payments.
  • Balance transfers are not a good option for long term debt management. The debt will still be there after the introductory period has passed, and many consumers find that they have just created another problem to solve when their introductory period ends.
  • Debt consolidation is one of the most popular reasons people choose to use balance transfers on their credit cards in Canada

You can save hundreds to thousands of dollars by paying more than the minimum on your credit cards

If you’re a credit card user, there’s a chance that you have taken advantage of this interest-free period and are paying only the minimum monthly payment. But if you’re like most Canadians, there’s also a good chance that your credit card balance has remained constant since signing on for the card or getting approved for a line of credit.

If you’re currently doing nothing about your debt, consider these statistics:

  • The average 2 person household has $41,500 in debt on their credit cards and lines of credit.
  • The average Canadian household carries an average debt load equal to 1/3rd of their annual income (not including mortgages).
  • The average Canadian owes $300,000+ on their mortgage alone!

Conclusion

The bottom line is that you should always try to pay more than the minimum amount on your credit cards. You will save money and reduce the length of time that it takes to pay off your debts. If you can’t afford to pay more than 2% of your balance, then don’t do it! Instead consider using another strategy for paying off debts such as contacting a counselor at CCDR and get a free consultation.

If you’re in debt, the stakes are high. You need to take action and get out of debt as soon as possible. But if you are considering buying a lottery ticket or waiting for a windfall from your favorite store’s loyalty program, stop. In this article, we will look at how these quick and easy solutions to financial problems can backfire on Canadians who are trying to get out of debt.

Build a budget

The first step is to create a budget, which can be as simple or as complicated as you want. A basic outline of the steps:

  • Track your spending for a month or so and see where your money goes
  • Make a list of all the things you want to buy in the next year, and prioritize them by how they fit into your life goals—this will help you decide what kind of lifestyle adjustments are necessary
  • If possible, sell unused items on Craigslist/Kijiji/eBay/VarageSale and then use that money towards debt payoff or savings accounts until you’re ready for another splurge purchase (or until an exciting opportunity presents itself).

Check your spending

>*If you’re serious about getting out of debt and building wealth, it’s time to take a hard look at your spending. You can do this by using any one of these tools:

  • A budgeting app or spreadsheet. These are great for tracking all the various things you spend money on—and can help you set goals for reducing spending in particular areas, too.
  • A pen and paper (or even just a few lines on your spreadsheet). If a full-blown budget isn’t really your thing, try keeping track of just your “fixed” expenses like rent/mortgage, utilities and groceries with nothing more than an old-fashioned list. This will help keep things simple without taking away from their effectiveness as an accountability tool!

>When it comes down to it though there’s no right answer here; what matters most is finding something that works for YOU!

Pay down debt

Paying off debt is an important step towards financial freedom. If you’re like most people in Canada, the amount of debt you have is likely significant compared to your income. However, it’s important to remember that there are two types of debt: interest and principle. Interest is the money paid each month on top of what you owe; principle is the original amount borrowed—the part that should be paid off first if possible.

The first step in getting out of debt is understanding how much you’re paying in interest versus paying down your principle balance each month (if at all). For example, let’s say John Smith has $15,000 worth of credit card debt at 25% annual interest rates and makes monthly payments of $200 per month towards his credit cards (which covers both interest and principle). In this case, his monthly payment would only go towards paying down 1% ($200/15000) or 0.6% ($200/$1500) annually.

Don’t rack up new debt

  • Don’t buy anything you can’t afford
  • Don’t borrow money to pay off your debt
  • Don’t use credit cards
  • Don’t use a payday loan
  • Don’t use a cheque cashing service (also called check-cashing or check-cashing outlets)
  • Don’t use a home equity line of credit

The chances are very low that money from the lottery will help you get out of debt. It is more likely to damage your finances.

It’s probably not a good idea to plan on winning the lottery to get out of debt. The chances are very low that money from the lottery will help you get out of debt. It is more likely to damage your finances.

There are many reasons why this is so. First, there’s the fact that lotteries are a tax on people who don’t understand math. Second, they’re a tax on people who think they can beat odds that defy logic. Thirdly, they’re a tax on those who have given up hope and feel like playing the lottery – something psychologists call “desperation.” Lastly, casinos rely heavily upon suckers for their profits – and what better sucker than someone desperate enough to buy lottery tickets?

Conclusion

Keep in mind that winning the lottery is not a surefire way to get out of debt. There are many cases of lottery winners who end up right back where they started when it comes to planning for their future. As we’ve discussed here, there are some ways you can improve your chances of winning big and keeping your finances stable after doing so — but none of them involve getting into more debt!

Payday loans are a source of quick cash that many Canadians use to get through the month. They can be convenient when you need money, but they also come with high interest rates and fees which make it hard to pay off your debt if you take one out. If you’re considering getting involved in a payday loan, here are some things you should know before making that decision:

Make Payment Arrangements With Your Creditors

When you’re faced with a problem, the first thing to do is look at your options. If you don’t have cash to pay your bills, consider working out a payment plan with your creditors.

Get on their good side by paying any interest that is due (but not yet late), and any fees, late fees or collection fees that are due but not yet charged. This could help them see you as reliable enough to extend more lenient terms when it comes time for another loan in the future (or who knows—maybe they’ll forget about this one altogether).

If you still can’t afford a loan payment after all of that, it may be time to contact a payday lender as an absolute last resort.

Use Your Tax Return To Pay Down Your Debt

  • Use your tax return to pay down your debt

The first thing you should do is use your tax return to pay down your debt. As a general rule, we recommend that you do this on the highest interest rate loan first (i.e., the one with the most expensive interest rate). This way, you’re able to save money in interest charges and payments and are able to get out of debt faster!

  • Get a loan from a friend or family member

If using your tax return doesn’t work for some reason, consider getting a loan from friends or family members at an interest rate that isn’t as high as payday loans but still gives them some income for helping you out. We recommend checking with them first before going anywhere else because they may be willing to lend money without charging any fees at all! You can also try asking around through social media if anyone has any extra cash lying around instead of taking out an expensive loan just yet.

  • Use A Credit Card To Pay Down Your Debt

If you can’t get a loan from friends or family members, try using your credit card to pay down your debt. This may be the only option left for some people who don’t want to take out an expensive loan just yet because they don’t have any other way of paying it back before their next payday comes around.

There are a lot of things you can do to keep from getting involved in a payday loan.

If you’re thinking about getting a payday loan, then there are some things you should know about them. First of all, if your friend asks for money and tells you that they will pay it back next week with their paycheck, don’t lend them any cash. This is what most people do by mistake when using payday loans because they think they’ll be able to pay it back after receiving their next paycheck. The problem is that these loans usually have very high interest rates attached to them which means that the amount due will keep growing every month until it becomes unbearable and/or impossible to pay off without taking out another loan or selling something valuable (like your car).

Instead of borrowing money from friends or family members who may not be able to afford giving out cash right now (and who would rather see other people succeed), ask for help from a professional financial advisor at www.ccdr.ca who specializes in helping people with debt problems like yours!

Budgeting During Inflation In Canada

Introduction

There are many reasons why inflation occurs. Food and fuel prices are often considered the biggest culprits, but the average consumer’s spending habits can play a big role as well. Inflation is inevitable and there’s no way to stop it, but that doesn’t mean you have to spend more money than you need to just because prices go up over time. It’s important to be prepared for inflation as best you can so that it doesn’t hurt your budget too much or even worse, put you into debt!

Being prepared

  • Being prepared: The most important thing you can do is to draw up a budget and plan for the future. As inflation creeps in, you want to make sure that your income keeps pace with it and doesn’t lag behind. This means planning ahead so that you can save more money when things are good, but also being flexible enough so that when things go awry (as they inevitably will), there’s still some cash flow left over each month.
  • Saving enough money: If your income is steady, then saving is easy—just set aside what’s left at the end of each month for savings or investments and keep doing it until it becomes habit! However, if your income varies from month-to-month or week-to-week (sometimes even day-to-day), then saving may be more difficult because sometimes there won’t be any money left over after covering expenses like rent/mortgage payments or groceries; this is where having an emergency fund comes in handy!

Look at your mortgage

If you have a fixed-rate mortgage, consider refinancing if rates drop. The longer the term of your mortgage, the better it is to refinance at lower rates. If you’re already in a variable rate, look into getting a fixed or capped rate that matches your current mortgage if rates drop.

Get ahead of things

Inflation is a tricky beast. It can sneak up on you without you even realizing it, and before you know it your budget is in shambles. It’s important to stay on top of inflation so that your financial situation doesn’t fall apart!

  • Look at your budget: If you’ve done a good job of tracking where your money goes each month, then this may be a breeze for you. If not, we recommend using an app like Mint or Quicken to track expenses for at least two months to get a better idea of how much money comes in versus how much goes out. Once that’s complete, create categories where appropriate and try to come up with some creative solutions if there are any red flags (for example: “Eating Out” might be too high).
  • Look at other areas of spending: Are there any areas where we could cut back? Where are our priorities? Is there anything else we could eliminate completely? This step will likely take some time—and possibly some tears—but setting aside personal luxuries means that when inflation hits hard again next year (or sooner), we’ll still have enough saved up for those rainy days.*

Save on food

If you are looking to save on food, there are some easy ways that you can do this. The first option is to buy in bulk. This will allow you to get a lot of the same product at once and then store it for later use. It may also be more cost effective than buying smaller quantities throughout the month or week.

Another good way to save money is by looking for sales and coupons from various stores that sell similar products, particularly grocery stores and supermarkets. You can also look for cheaper alternatives like lower quality items or cheaper brands than what you normally buy as well as cheaper stores and meal options like eating out less often or cooking your meals at home instead of ordering out on nights when possible (which will save even more money).

Buy cheaper brands

There are many ways of lowering your grocery bill without sacrificing quality. Some options are as simple as buying generic brands, while others might require some planning and preparation. Here’s a list of tips to keep in mind when shopping for groceries:

  • Buy store brands instead of name-brand products
  • Buy in bulk when possible (e.g., at Costco)
  • Buy in season or on sale
  • Buy on Amazon (if you have a Prime membership)

Use coupons

Coupons are one of the easiest ways to save money on your groceries, and they’re also a great way to save money on other items you purchase. You can find coupons in newspapers, magazines, online and in stores. Coupons typically allow you to buy an item at a lower cost than normal price; however some coupons may even include free products!

The following are some examples of how you can use coupons:

  • Use them as currency for trading within your community (e.g., swapping clothes with friends).
  • Give them away as gifts for birthdays or holidays.* Don’t throw away expired ones! They still have value!

Cut back on eating out

Eating out is a luxury, so you should cut back on it when times are tough. The best way to do this is to eat at home more often and only eat out less often. If you do decide to go out, try eating at cheaper restaurants or even fast food chains like McDonald’s or Burger King. You’ll save yourself some money and get some good value for your buck.

Buy generic brands

  • Generic brands are usually cheaper
  • Generic brands are usually the same quality as brand names
  • Generic brands are usually available at the same stores as brand names

Take stock of your bills

To start, list all of the monthly bills you pay. These include things like rent or mortgage payments, car insurance and gas costs, grocery bills and utility bills (water/electricity). Next, figure out how much money you spend on each bill per month, per year and even per week/day/hour if possible.

Now that you have a clear picture of how much money is going out every month, we can begin to identify potential areas where we can cut back on spending.

Reconsider utilities

One of the first things you should do as a budgeter is to look at your utility bills. Look for anything that can be done to lower your cost, whether it’s changing providers, using less electricity or water, or switching from heating oil to natural gas. If you find yourself driving long distances every day for work and need to cut back on gas usage, consider taking public transportation instead of driving yourself (or maybe even getting rid of one car altogether).

Inflation is inevitable, but that doesn’t mean you can’t plan ahead.

Inflation is a natural process that occurs when the supply of money grows faster than the demand for it. When this happens, prices rise and the purchasing power of your money decreases.

Inflation does not happen overnight; it takes time for inflation to increase from 0% to 2%. And it’s important to remember that inflation is not just something that affects you and me as consumers in our day-to-day lives, but also affects businesses who need to adjust their prices accordingly in order to stay competitive in the market place.

However—just because we know what causes inflation doesn’t mean we have control over how much it will occur or when! Inflation can be very unpredictable so we all have a role here: stay informed about current economic news so you can plan ahead accordingly!

Conclusion

With inflation being a fact of life, it’s important that you take steps to plan for it. By being prepared and looking at ways in which you can cut back on spending when prices go up, you can avoid getting caught off guard when your grocery bill suddenly goes up or electricity rates increase without warning.